Category Archives: Publications

Published to Pasture…Soil Health!

Soil Health…kind of catchy, right?!  I agree.  And, so do thousands of other range managers and landowners.  It’s the buzz word of the century and it’s here to stay.  So what do we know about soil health and how the heck can our ranchers use it? Today, we will be looking at 2 relatively recent articles on soil health.  First, “Usable Science: Soil Health” written by Justin Derner, Chuck Stanley, and Chad Ellis.  Secondly, we will look at “Soil Health as a Transformational Change Agent for US Grazing… Read More →

Published to Pasture…Liability and Prescribed Fire: Perception and Reality (EPPBA)

In 2017, a group of prescribed fire researchers (including me!) set out to answer the age-old question…is prescribed fire liability…prescribed fire’s scapegoat?  Check out this work that talks about the Edwards Plateau Prescribed Burn Association escape prescribed fire lawsuit here. (J.R.Weir,U.P.Kreuter,C.L.Wonkka,etal.,LiabilityandPrescribedFire:PerceptionandReality,RangelandEcology&Management, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rama.2018.11.010) Although use of prescribed fire by private landowners in the southern Great Plains has increased during the past 30 yr, studies have determined that liability concerns are a major reason why many landowners do not use or promote the use of prescribed fire. Generally, perceptions of… Read More →

Published to Pasture…Collaborative Adaptive Rangeland Management

In 2018, Wilmer and others published “Collaborative adaptive rangeland management foster management-science partnerships” in Rangeland Ecology and Management (check it out here).  I really valued this paper, because fostering management-science relationships is what Extension is all about! This paper is a case study, based on qualitative social data collected from meeting notes and interview transcripts recorded from ranchers and agency representatives in a Collaborative Adaptive Rangeland Management (CARM) study. In this synthetic assessment, they explored to what extent participation in the CARM experiment enabled adaptive decision making by… Read More →

Managing Heat for Wildlife on Texas Rangelands

I am a really, really lucky Range Specialist!  I get to have one of the most amazing jobs and work across the hall from a very intelligent Wildlife Specialist!  We decided to combine forces and have recently published “Managing Heat for Wildlife on Texas Rangelands”.  You can find the publication here.  Check it out and download it!  It’s free!