Tag Archives: Stink Bugs

Cotton Near Cutout

Much of our cotton fields are at or near cutout.  The fields we have been in this week range from 2-6 nodes above white flower (NAWF).  Keep in mind the time for a white bloom to  mature into an open boll is around 50 days. We are finding bollworms in non-Bt and 2-gene Bt cotton such as Bollgard 2 and Twin-Link cotton varieties.  I have not found much damage or worms in the 3-gene cotton varieties containing the VIP gene. Treat cotton fields when square and boll damage… Read More →

Midge in Grain Sorghum

Grain sorghum fields range in maturity from nearing bloom to soft dough and all of these fields need to be scouted frequently. Blooming sorghum is susceptible to sorghum midge and field scouts are finding more midge in the fields this week. Scout sorghum fields 2-3 times per week until past bloom. Start by scouting fields on the south side (downwind) as the midge is a poor flyer and will be found on the field margins first. When you are finding them on field margins, move 150-200 feet into… Read More →

Stink Bugs in Grain Sorghum

The Stink Bug is a primary insect pest of grain sorghum from bloom until hard dough. The insect feeds directly on the seed, reducing seed weight and yield. The most common stink bug in grain sorghum of the Mid-Coast is the Rice Stink Bug. Scout sorghum after bloom using a small bucket and beat heads into the bucket and see what is being captured in the bucket. Look here for a brief video. Economic thresholds (ET) have been evaluated and can be determined using tables or equations, but this… Read More →

Stink Bugs in Soybean Fields

Over the past week we have been finding increased numbers of stink bugs in soybean fields.  Most of these stink bugs were green, southern green and red-banded stink bugs. My preferred method to scout for stink bugs is the sweep net, but a good alternative is the drop cloth. As a last resort, you can shake the plants over the furrow and see what falls onto the ground. The disadvantage of shaking on the ground is you may miss some of the insects that can fall into cracks… Read More →

Nodes Above White Flower

Counting Nodes Above White Flower (NAWF) is a good way to monitor a cotton field’s maturity after bloom. The process is done by finding the first position white flower and counting the number of nodes (branches) above the branch with the white flower. The last node to count is the highest node with an unfurled main stem leaf (at least 1-inch wide). NAWF is useful for management of your cotton crop. By tracking NAWF, you can see how the crop is maturing compared to an expected growth curve. … Read More →