Tag Archives: Cotton Aphids

Early Season Cotton IPM

The oldest cotton in the Mid-Coast is squaring and the youngest is just emerging from the ground.  Pest management in early season is primarily focused on two or three insect pests: Thrips, Cotton Fleahopper and Aphids. It is important to consider the pest, its numbers and the crop stage when deciding whether or not to add an insecticide to the tank.  Even if it only costs $1, an unneeded tank partner will reduce crop profits. Thrips can be a yield limiting pest until the cotton plants have 4-5… Read More →

Early Season Cotton Pests

Cotton in the field is as old as 3-4 leaf stage. This year’s crop has already been through a lot of turmoil from high winds and blowing sand to cold temperatures in the 40s. Early season cotton insect pests include thrips, aphids and mites. Seed treatments are usually effective in controlling these pests but sometimes problems will still occur. We have found several fields in Calhoun County with mite problems. Mites feed on the underside of the leaf. They feed by piercing plant cells with their mouthparts and sucking… Read More →

Cotton Aphids in Seedling Cotton

Cotton field maturity ranges from emergence to plants with 3-4 true leaves. Most fields are cotyledon to 1-true leaf. The normal insect pests we see in seedling cotton include thrips, cutworms, mites and aphids. When scouting seedling cotton plants, I usually pull a plant from the ground and look at the leaves for insects.  This week I have found Cotton Aphids in many fields.  Most of the aphids are winged, indicating they have recently arrived. But some plants have both winged and small wingless aphids. First, aphids are rarely yield limiting to seedling cotton plants.  Most… Read More →

Cotton Pest Management News – May 29, 2015

Cotton maturity ranges from 2-3 leaf to 13-15 nodes on the plant.  Maturity is not being determined by square size right now because fruit retention is very poor in much of the older cotton.  We are seeing between 40 and 70% square set in cotton fields. The primary reason for fruit loss this year is not insect pests.  Usually we think of cotton fleahoppers as the primary factor causing fruit loss but their populations have been relatively low.  Most fields have less than 5 cotton fleahoppers per 100… Read More →