Tag Archives: Grain Sorghum

Sorghum Hybrid Trial Results from Refugio County

The Sorghum Hybrid Trial in Refugio County was harvested in Austwell, TX on July 2, 2020. These results should be used along with other similar tests from South Texas to help determine the what to plant next year.                

Southeast Regional Row Crop Initiative Grain & Cotton Marketing Update

Join us June 17, 2020 at 7:00 am Dr. Mark Welch – AgriLife Grain Marketing Specialist Dr. John Robinson – AgriLife Cotton Marketing Specialist Guest Speaker: David Gibson, Executive Director, Texas Corn Producers To Join Zoom Meeting Click Here: Meeting ID: 937 0559 2814 Password: 118219 SERRCI Flyer Invite

Sugarcane Aphids Found in Sorghum

Grain sorghum fields in the Mid-Coast vary in maturity from soft/hard dough to pre-bloom. These fields should be scouted weekly for insect pests. Today, we found sugarcane aphids in fields near Bayside. While these fields are not at a level needing treatment, the population should be monitored twice weekly to ensure they don’t get out of hand. Sugarcane aphids can cause grain yield losses until a few weeks prior to harvest, but the crop is more sensitive to the aphids earlier in the season. As the sorghum grain… Read More →

Grain Sorghum Across the Board

Sorghum fields range in maturity from 4-5 leaf to bloom. This is the result of planting across 5-6 weeks. As a result of this we need to be on the lookout for a wide variety of insect pests. Headed sorghum should be checked for stink bugs and headworms. Scout for these pests using a small bucket, beating the heads into the bucket and count what remains. Follow this link for a brief video demonstrating how to scout sorghum after bloom. LINK My economic threshold for headworms is 1… Read More →

Unique Production Season Ahead

When I first moved down to Port Lavaca, at a crop tour, growers were talking how much experience they had farming.  One replied he had “1 year experience, 40 times.” I think there is a lot of truth to that statement.  It seems each year presents it’s own production challenges. So how is 2020 different from other years? There are two obvious differences: lower than normal rainfall and higher than average temperatures. Much of insect and plant activity occurs as a response to three variables. These variables are… Read More →