Category Archives: Cotton

2021 Texas High Plains Cotton Harvest-Aid Guide

Murilo Maeda, Extension Specialist – Cotton, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Wayne Keeling, Systems Agronomist, Texas A&M AgriLife Research       INTRODUCTION Cotton is cultivated as an annual crop but is inherently a deciduous perennial. As such, it is a flexible crop that responds well to both environmental and management factors. Harvest-aid chemicals are generally used to facilitate mechanical harvest of a mature crop by promoting leaf abscission, boll opening, and desiccating plants for stripper harvest. Premature application of these chemicals can result in loss of lint… Read More →

Cotton Management Following Inundated or Saturated Conditions  

Dr. Benjamin McKnight Extension Cotton Specialist, TAMU Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences, College Station, (979) 845-0870   After a dry start to the 2021 Texas cotton growing year, most of the production regions around the state have received much needed relief to drought conditions. The Texas drought monitor maps from the month of April puts into perspective how dry conditions were across the state, with approximately 90% of Texas in some form of moisture deficit. Currently in July, approximately 90% of the state is not considered to… Read More →

2021 Alternative Crop Options after Failed Cotton & Late-Season Crop Planting for the Texas South Plains

Dr. Calvin Trostle, Extension Agronomy, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu; Dr. Murilo Maeda, Extension Cotton Specialist, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, mmaeda@ag.tamu.edu; This annual guide will be posted at http://lubbock.tamu.edu by Monday, June 14.  Last year’s guide is essentially the same (see below) except crop prices for most crops are much higher, even 50% in cases.  The information remains applicable to the week of July 5th for a few late planting decisions like sunflower, grain sorghum, and… Read More →

Cotton foliar symptoms in western Texas driven by weather, not disease

Reagan Noland, Assistant Professor and Extension Agronomist Tom Isakeit, Professor and Extension Plant Pathologist   Cotton across much of western Texas has recently displayed varying levels of premature defoliation and foliar discoloration following a drastic shift from hot and dry to abnormally cold and wet conditions in early September. The stark visual symptoms raised many questions and concerns regarding potential impacts to yield and quality, whether the situation could have been prevented, and whether intervention would have yielded any benefit. Producers and industry professionals have suspected foliar disease… Read More →

2020 Alternative Crop Options after Failed Cotton & Late-Season Crop Planting for the Texas South Plains

Dr. Calvin Trostle, Extension Agronomy, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu; Dr. Murilo Maeda, Extension Cotton Specialist, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, mmaeda@ag.tamu.edu; June 15, 2020   This annual guide was released in mid-June. The information is still applicable the week of July 6th for a few late planting decisions like sunflower, grain sorghum, and summer annual forages. The information targets the Texas South Plains (Lubbock region), but the information’s crop discussion, last recommended planting dates, and industry… Read More →

Current and upcoming options for managing reniform nematode in cotton

Jennifer Dudak1 and Reagan Noland2 1. Graduate Research Assistant, Texas A&M University 2. Assistant Professor & Extension Agronomist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, San Angelo, TX As the threat of reniform nematodes increases on cotton yields in Texas, so does the need for tools to contend with this pest. A two-part study was initiated to identify the most effective management tools among cotton genetics and nematicides. This is a brief summary of findings from the first year (2019) at three locations across the state with known reniform nematode… Read More →

East and South Texas Cotton Harvest Aids: The Art and Science

By James Griffin Cotton Extension PhD. Student   Applying cotton harvest aids has been referred to as an art.  In this article, we will examine methods to change the narrative to more of a science.  The first decision to make is when to “pull the trigger,” secondly rather to make one or two applications, and finally which products to use.  From my experience, the 60% open boll method has been the standard for some time although other methods are most likely more accurate than eye balling percentage open… Read More →

Cotton Blue Disease, A Virus Disease Not in Texas, So Far

    A new virus disease of cotton found so far in several southeastern US states has attracted a lot of attention lately.  This is the “cotton blue disease”, which is caused by the cotton leaf roll dwarf virus.  Symptoms are seen in the new growth following virus infection and include stunting, blistering or crinkling of leaves (Figure 1), and downward cupping of leaves (Figure 2).  Other symptoms can include reddening, shortened internodes, upward cupping of leaves and abnormal top growth.  Plants may also exhibit a green-blue leaf… Read More →

Insect Pest Update

Dr. David Kerns, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service   Cotton: Cotton fleahoppers (CFH) have been extremely bad in cotton this year throughout the eastern half of Texas. In the Brazos River Bottom we have fields running 100-150% CFH infestation based on terminal inspections; the threshold is 10-15%. These large populations are the result of ample rainfall and production of weedy host harboring CFH. The good news is CFH are easy to kill with the right insecticides. The bad news is the CFH are continually reinvesting sprayed cotton and… Read More →

2019 Alternative Crop Options after Failed Cotton and Late-Season Crop Planting for the Texas South Plains

With continued rains in much of the Texas High Plains, many farmers are far behind on planting goals for cotton and some other crops.  Some farmers began indicating by June 3 that after yet another rain they would no longer trying to plant cotton.   So, this places our High Plains of Texas farmers in a possible replant decision on a failed crop, usually cotton, or pushes planting back so much that cotton or other full-season crops are no longer viable.  What to do?  What are my options?… Read More →