Author Archives: ahairston1

Next “First Tuesday” Statewide Hemp Zoom Update from Texas A&M AgriLife

Dr. Calvin Trostle, Professor & Extension Agronomist/AgriLife State Hemp Specialist, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu   We continue the statewide Zoom updates we began in March.  The September update will be Tuesday, September 7, 5:15-6:30 PM Central Time.  We will continue throughout 2021 at the same time on the first Tuesday.   September topics will include some overviews of current AgriLife field projects (mostly fiber), observations statewide on industrial hemp fiber lines and desired delayed reproductive growth, and how hemp fiber and… Read More →

Product Changes from Dupont’s ‘Prevathon’ to new FMC ‘Vantacor’

Dr. Calvin Trostle, Professor & Extension Agronomist/AgriLife State Hemp Specialist, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu Dupont’s popular insecticide Prevathon is now a product of FMC.  The use instructions for crops and pests are essentially the same.  The percentage of active ingredient ‘RynaXypyr’, or chlorantraniliprole, is much different.  This leads to large changes in the labeled application rates.  Prevathon was 5.0%, Vantacor is 47.85%. Prevathon became popular for several reasons.  First, there is some limited movement—translaminar flow is what Dupont called it—within plant… Read More →

Cover Crops for Weed Management and Conservation Agriculture in Texas

Jodie Reisner, Spencer Samuelson and Muthukumar Bagavathiannan   Integrated weed management (IWM) is a diverse approach to managing weeds, which combines complementary approaches for desired weed management results (Figure 1). Studying the cultural, mechanical, physical, and biological forms in combination with chemical forms at the farm level can offer producers insights as to what can work effectively on their farms. IWM entails cultural tactics such as crop rotations, adjusting seeding rates, planting cover crops between cropping seasons to suppress weed emergence, minimizing weed seed rain through harvest weed… Read More →

End of Season Heat Unit Accumulation for Northerly Texas Sorghum

Dr. Calvin Trostle, Extension Agronomy, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu; This item originally appeared in the “Sorghum Insider,” an online newsletter of the Texas Grain Sorghum Association. A crop consultant texted August 30th about a grain sorghum field near Plainview in Hale County, Texas.   “Would you spend any money on sorghum if it is still pre-boot near Plainview, TX?  I am seeing 5 to 10 army worms per whorl.  Could be devastating but not sure if the sorghum has time to… Read More →

Wheat Variety Grain Picks for Texas – 2021-2022

Dr. Fernando Guillen-Portal, Small Grains Extension Specialist, Soil & Crop Sciences Dept. College Station, (406) 579-5638, f.guillenportal@agnet.tamu.edu Dr. Calvin Trostle, Extension Agronomy, TAMU Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 723-8432, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu Russ Garetson, MS, Small Grains Extension Program Specialist, TAMU Soil & Crop Sciences, College Station, (214) 460-5510, russ.garetson@ag.tamu.edu   Continuing an established tradition, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension has identified the annual winter wheat variety “Pick’s list” for the 2021-2022 growing season for each of the wheat variety testing regions in Texas, the High Plains, Rolling… Read More →

2021 Texas High Plains Cotton Harvest-Aid Guide

Murilo Maeda, Extension Specialist – Cotton, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Wayne Keeling, Systems Agronomist, Texas A&M AgriLife Research       INTRODUCTION Cotton is cultivated as an annual crop but is inherently a deciduous perennial. As such, it is a flexible crop that responds well to both environmental and management factors. Harvest-aid chemicals are generally used to facilitate mechanical harvest of a mature crop by promoting leaf abscission, boll opening, and desiccating plants for stripper harvest. Premature application of these chemicals can result in loss of lint… Read More →

TEXAS ROLLING PLAINS PICKS LIST FOR 2021-2022

Emi Kimura, Assistant Professor and Extension Agronomist Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Vernon, TX Emi.kimura@ag.tamu.edu   2020-2021 Cropping Season in Review The wheat season started with mild soil temperature in the fall of 2020. However, dry condition persisted during planting season through March, which reduced forage production potential for dual-purpose and small grain pastures in the Rolling Plains.  In addition to the lack of soil moisture, snowstorm in mid-February slowed the development of small grain, which further reduced forage production in the region.  Although freeze injury was minimal… Read More →

Fall Armyworm Control in Pastures

Dalton C. Ludwick, Holly Davis, Sonja L. Swiger, and David L. Kerns Extension Entomologists, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Recent rainfall events have been a major problem this summer. As a result of this rainfall, fall armyworms (Spodoptera frugiperda) are thriving across the northern, central and eastern portions of Texas. Below is some information on the biology of the pest, how to scout for them, and control options to mitigate damage. Biology and Damage There are two strains of fall armyworms (FAW): the corn strain and the grass… Read More →

Cotton Management Following Inundated or Saturated Conditions  

Dr. Benjamin McKnight Extension Cotton Specialist, TAMU Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences, College Station, (979) 845-0870   After a dry start to the 2021 Texas cotton growing year, most of the production regions around the state have received much needed relief to drought conditions. The Texas drought monitor maps from the month of April puts into perspective how dry conditions were across the state, with approximately 90% of Texas in some form of moisture deficit. Currently in July, approximately 90% of the state is not considered to… Read More →

Cover Crops for Weed Management and Conservation Agriculture in Texas

Texas Row Crops Newsletter – Jodie McVane Reisner – May 2021 Jodie Reisner, Spencer Samuelson and Muthukumar Bagavathiannan   Integrated weed management (IWM) is a diverse approach to managing weeds, which combines complementary approaches for desired weed management results (Figure 1). Studying the cultural, mechanical, physical, and biological forms in combination with chemical forms at the farm level can offer producers insights as to what can work effectively on their farms. IWM entails cultural tactics such as crop rotations, adjusting seeding rates, planting cover crops between cropping seasons… Read More →