Category Archives: 2023

Is there any meaningful value in volunteer wheat?

 Occasional stands, though “free,” tend to hold false promise.   Calvin Trostle, Ph.D., Professor & Extension Agronomist, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu       A Floyd Co., Texas farmer sent the pic below of what I regard as the “best” stand of volunteer wheat I have ever seen.  “What will happen to this wheat?” the farmer asked.  “Can I use it?”   Fig. 1.  Volunteer wheat in Floyd Co. that is thick enough to prompt questions about whether a farmer could… Read More →

Certified Seed Only (CSO) and Plant Variety Protection Act:  Wheat Varieties

What farmers can and cannot do regarding saving grain for planting seed   Calvin Trostle, Ph.D., Professor & Extension Agronomist, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu David Drake, Ph.D., Integrated Pest Management Extension Agent, Hunt Co., Commerce, (903) 468-3295, david.drake@ag.tamu.edu August 15, 2023   In the past few years, many if not most wheat seed companies have implemented additional protections on many if not most of their wheat varieties.  This includes limiting planting to Certified Seed Only (CSO).  This means a CSO variety… Read More →

BLACKLANDS & NORTHEAST TEXAS WHEAT PICKS LIST FOR 2023-2024

Dr. David Drake, AgriLife Extension IPM Agent Commerce, TX david.drake@ag.tamu.edu, (903) 468-3295   The AgriLife Extension wheat Picks varieties were selected based on area Uniform Variety Trial (UVT) for grain-only variety trials.  Our ongoing Picks criteria include a minimum of three years of data in Texas A&M AgriLife wheat variety trials across multiple locations.  A “Pick” variety means this:  given the data, these are the varieties we would choose to include and emphasize on our farm for wheat grain production.  Picks are not necessarily the numerical top yielders… Read More →

NORTHERN ROLLING PLAINS WHEAT VARIETY PICKS LIST FOR 2023-2024

Dr. Emi Kimura, Extension agronomist, Vernon (940) 552-9941, emi.kimura@ag.tamu.edu   The AgriLife Extension wheat Picks varieties were selected based on area Uniform Variety Trial (UVT) for grain-only variety trials.  Our ongoing Picks criteria include a minimum of three years of data in Texas A&M AgriLife wheat variety trials across multiple locations.  A “Pick” variety means this:  given the data, these are the varieties we would choose to include and emphasize on our farm for wheat grain production.  Picks are not necessarily the numerical top yielders as important disease… Read More →

TEXAS SOUTHERN ROLLING PLAINS/Abilene & CONCHO VALLEY REGION WHEAT PICKS LIST FOR 2023-2024

Dr. Reagan Noland, Assistant Professor & Extension Agronomist Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, San Angelo, TX reagan.noland@ag.tamu.edu (325) 653-4576   Picks and Watch List Varieties for 2023-2024 Growing Season in Southern Rolling Plains/Abilene/Concho Valley region— The AgriLife Extension wheat Picks varieties were selected based on area Uniform Variety Trial (UVT) for grain-only variety trials.  Our ongoing Picks criteria include a minimum of three years of data in Texas A&M AgriLife wheat variety trials across multiple locations.  A “Pick” variety means this:  given the data, these are the varieties… Read More →

Wheat Grain Variety Picks for the Texas High Plains in 2023-2024 & 2022-2023 Texas High Plains Wheat Production Summary

Dr. Jourdan M. Bell, Associate Professor and Agronomist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and Research, Amarillo, jourdan.bell@ag.tamu.edu, (806) 341-8925 Dr. Calvin Trostle, Professor and Agronomist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, Lubbock, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu, (806) 746-6101     2022-2023 Wheat Cropping Season in Review   The 2022-2023 wheat season was marked by extreme weather events. Continued drought conditions in fall 2022 resulted in poor planting conditions across most of the Texas High Plains. Timely planted fields benefited from late September and early October 2022 rainfall, but fields quickly dried out. In most… Read More →

Soil Testing Principles- Part 3

This item is adapted from an AgriLife submission to Texas Grain Sorghum Association’s “Sorghum Insider”   Calvin Trostle, Ph.D., Professor & Extension Agronomist, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu Part III (Part 4 in a future ‘Texas Row Crops Newsletter’)   Eight Soil Test Pointers for Texas Crops:   Part I: What is your soil test lab’s philosophy of nutrient provision? Part II: What does your soil test lab base fertilizer recommendations on? Part III: Do you use a soil test lab that… Read More →

The Winding Path of Stink Bug Management in Grain Sorghum

This item is adapted from an AgriLife submission to Texas Grain Sorghum Association’s “Sorghum Insider” Dalton Ludwick, Ph.D., Assistant Professor & Extension Entomologist, TAMU Dept. of Entomology, Corpus Christi, (361) 698-7400 ext. 1225, dalton.ludwick@ag.tamu.edu, Twitter: @SouthTXBugs Insecticides There are several key pests of grain sorghum production in Texas. Along the Coastal Bend, rice stink bug is a major, annual pest that moves between non-crop hosts and crops (e.g., rice, grain sorghum). In 2009, Dr. M.O. Way (retired professor, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Beaumont) documented poor control with an… Read More →

Keeping Current with AgriLife Extension Test Lab Submittal Forms

This item is adapted from an AgriLife submission to Texas Grain Sorghum Association’s “Sorghum Insider” Calvin Trostle, Ph.D., Professor & Extension Agronomist, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu The Texas A&M Soil/Water/Forage Testing Lab, https://soiltesting.tamu.edu/, is in College Station.  It is a public lab that participates in the North American Proficiency Testing program for quality control/quality assurance.   There are five types of general tests the Soi/Water/Forage Testing Lab (SWFTL) performs.  These are not limited to soil!  The types and their direct links… Read More →

More than Colorful Pictures:  Additional Uses for the U.S. Drought Monitor

This item is adapted from the July 3 Texas A&M—AgriLife Agronomic Monday Memo (TAM-AAMM). Calvin Trostle, Ph.D., Professor & Extension Agronomist, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu A bird’s eye view of drought conditions in your general area     Fig. 1.  Comparison of Texas drought conditions on June 27, 2023, versus an earlier date of your choice (here three months earlier, March 28, 2023).  Statistics give the percentage of each drought category.  This side-by-side comparison of dates is one of many functions… Read More →