Category Archives: Sorghum

Late Planting of Grain Sorghum Across Texas?

This item was first prepared for Texas Grain Sorghum Association’s “Sorghum Insider” South & Coastal Texas With record high prices on grain sorghum in much of Texas, some have wondered if the prices might stir interest in Central & South Texas of planting a mid-and late summer sorghum crop for fall production.  Texas A&M AgriLife does not have data on the potential for these crops if planted in Central Texas, the Coastal Bend, and far South Texas.  Historically this has never been a practice.  AgriLife Extension agents Vidal… Read More →

Herbicide Management in Corn and Forage Sorghum Silage Crops

Jourdan Bell, Kevin Heflin, Vanessa Corriher-Olsen, and Pete Dotray   In response to increasing silage demands, Texas producers are growing more corn and forage sorghum for silage.  In recent years, some producers are also making late season decisions to harvest corn intended for grain as silage due to favorable silage markets. As producers make preplant agronomic decisions, it is important to select herbicides that are labeled for the silage crops if there is a contingency plan to chop a grain crop for silage.   Although it is commonly… Read More →

Texas A&M AgriLife “Sorghum Tips”

    Dr. Calvin Trostle, Extension Agronomy/TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu     Finally—Commercially Available Herbicide-Tolerant Grain Sorghums   We have heard about this for years.  In 2022 there will finally be some options for Texas grain sorghum farmers to consider.  Seed for at least some limited acreage of three different herbicide-tolerant grain sorghum hybrids will be available.   These will be best for sorghum farmers that struggle with grass control in grain sorghum.  Grain sorghum itself is a grass, so otherwise… Read More →

Prussic Acid and Nitrate in Forages, Especially Sorghums

Dr. Calvin Trostle, Extension Agronomy, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu   A short version of this item originally appeared in the “Sorghum Insider,” an online newsletter of the Texas Grain Sorghum Association.   I have received several calls from growers in the past three weeks about prussic acid and nitrate accumulation in forages.  These inquiries are routine in the fall starting in mid-October in the Texas High Plains as the first heavy frosts and freezes occur.  Then questions progress downstate as low… Read More →

End of Season Heat Unit Accumulation for Northerly Texas Sorghum

Dr. Calvin Trostle, Extension Agronomy, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu; This item originally appeared in the “Sorghum Insider,” an online newsletter of the Texas Grain Sorghum Association. A crop consultant texted August 30th about a grain sorghum field near Plainview in Hale County, Texas.   “Would you spend any money on sorghum if it is still pre-boot near Plainview, TX?  I am seeing 5 to 10 army worms per whorl.  Could be devastating but not sure if the sorghum has time to… Read More →

Impact of Ponded Water/Flooding on Corn and Sorghum

Ronnie Schnell, Ph.D. Associate Professor and Cropping Systems Specialist Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, College Station   Tony Provin, Ph.D. Professor and Extension Specialist – Soil Chemistry Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, College Station   Numerous rain events have resulted in flooding or significant ponding of water in many corn and sorghum fields across Texas. While low-lying areas may be flooded, other areas of fields may be saturated for extended periods of time. How long can corn or sorghum survive under saturated or flooded conditions? What impact will these conditions… Read More →

Freeze Injury, Low Temperature Stress and Chill Injury in Corn and Sorghum

  Dr. Ronnie Schnell Cropping Systems Specialist – College Station       Introduction Recent cold weather has affected newly planted, emerging or emerged corn or sorghum throughout south and central Texas. Corn and sorghum will experience similar types of injury although tolerance to low temperatures does differ between the crops to some degree. Sorghum generally requires warmer soil temperatures. Three types of injury may be observed, depending on stage of growth and temperatures experience above and below ground. This includes imbibition injury, cold stress, and frost/freeze damage…. Read More →

Grain Sorghum Pricing for 2021 & Managing Your Crop

Updated from the November ‘Texas Sorghum Insider’ (Texas Grain Sorghum Assn.)   Prospects for grain sorghum acreage in Texas in 2021 are more favorable than the past several years.  Pricing is up with adjustments relative to Dec21 corn ($4.18/bu as of this writing).  Depending on your Texas location this puts the hundredweight price in the range of $8.00/cwt and even $9.00/cwt near the Texas Gulf Coast.  Of course, there is a lot that can happen between now and planting time let alone harvest time in 2021.   These… Read More →

Fall Concerns about Prussic Acid & Nitrate in Sorghums

Dr. Calvin Trostle, Extension Agronomy, TAMU Dept. of Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, (806) 746-6101, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu When our next Row Crops Newsletter is published in early November, a large portion of Texas will have seen heavy frost and a freeze on some sorghums.  So, this is good time to update Texas on prussic acid (a plant form of cyanide) and nitrates in sorghums.  These include sorghum/sudans (haygrazers), forage sorghums, and also grain sorghum where cattle will graze after harvest or on drought-failed grain sorghum (Fig. 1).  Sorghum after… Read More →

Summer Annual Forages for Texas—Sorghum/Sudan & Hybrid Pearl Millet

Dr. Calvin Trostle, Extension Agronomy, TAMU Soil & Crop Sciences, Lubbock, TX (806) 723-8432, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu February 10, 2020   I have written previously for Texas Row Crops Newsletter about hybrid pearl millet (HPM) in May 2015 and June 2017.  The focus of then was the tolerance if not near absence of sugarcane aphid (SCA) activity in HPM.  We continue to regard HPM as a poor host for SCA.  Additional evidence in several Texas locations since 2017 reaffirms this.   For Texas forage growers, HPM remains a potential alternative… Read More →