Category Archives: Uncategorized

Get Ready for Azalea Season

Despite the recent cold and cloudy weather slowing down the start of our azalea blooming season, the official Tyler Azalea Trail annual celebration kicks off Sunday, March 22 with a ribbon cutting at the Pyron’s lovely garden on Dobbs Street in Tyler. Some nice sunny and warm days should speed up bud break and the wonderful display, not only on the Tyler Azalea Trail, but all across our region. I have written about azaleas many times before, and why not? Our climate and soils are so well-suited for… Read More →

Dormant Oil Sprays

Winter time is prime time to apply, if needed, a dormant oil spray to deciduous fruit, nut and certain landscape trees and shrubs to control scale and other insect pests. Horticultural oils are highly refined petroleum products for controlling scale, mites and other overwintering insects and their eggs on plants. Horticultural oils work mainly by coating pests with a suffocating film of fine oil. Their toxic action is more physical than chemical and is short-lived. Horticultural oils for controlling insect pests have been around for many decades. Initially,… Read More →

Crapemyrtles for Great Summer Color

You know summer has arrived in the South when the cicadas start singing and the crapemyrtles are blooming. Crapemyrtles are among the most popular of the small trees in the southern United States because of their beauty, long season of bloom, compact size, hardiness and longevity. It is common to find stately, thriving crapemyrtles well over 100 years old at old homesteads, abandoned home sites or cemeteries. Crapemyrtles have been called the lilac of the south, being cultivated in the U.S. since the early 1800’s. The common crapemyrtle,… Read More →

Home Garden Tour June 7

Looking for ideas for enhancing your home landscape? Or, do you enjoy visiting beautiful gardens? This Saturday, June 7, you have a rare chance to do just that during the Home Garden Tour sponsored by the Smith County Master Gardener Association. Four very different and unique private home gardens will be open for your viewing pleasure and inspiration. Styles include an extensive formal walled garden, a small yard with unusual recycled garden art, a backyard that combines both traditional and Japanese styles, and a large woodland garden filled… Read More →

Upcoming Gardening and other Educational Programs

This is the time of year that is loaded up with opportunities to sharpen your skills or learn more about gardening, landscaping and related topics. The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service provides a variety of educational programs and topics to the citizens of our great State. Here is a listing of some of the many upcoming programs in the northeast Texas area that might be of interest to you. For more details and other regional educational opportunities, go to the East Texas Gardening web site and the Educational… Read More →

Time to Plant Home Orchard

If you have been contemplating walking out your back door and harvesting fresh blueberries, peaches, blackberries, figs, persimmons, or other fruiting delights, now is the time to plan and plant for those future harvests. Nurseries are beginning to receive fresh shipments of fruit, nut and berry plants, ready for planting. Before rushing to make that purchase, you first need to do some homework. Make sure that the fruit type and variety you select will grow and produce for you – and that you are able to provide the… Read More →

Salvias for Texas-Tough Summer Color

  One of the most diverse and useful groups of plants for summer color must be the sages – botanically known as the Salvias.  Native to many places in the world, including Texas, salvias have become a staple for garden designers creating long-lasting colorful beds.  Garden-worthy salvias range from Texas-tough perennials to tender annuals that have been extensively bred for the bedding plant industry.  Colors take on the rainbow, from purple to red, with blues, whites, and even yellow. Salvias are in the mint family, all of which… Read More →

Watch Out for Falling Pecans and Branches

It was a beautiful, sunny afternoon – not a cloud in the sky. The air was still, almost stifling, when suddenly, “Craaack! Wham! Thud!” You look around and there is a very large pecan limb lying (hopefully) in the middle of the lawn. A close inspection of the broken ends reveals no clues as to what happened to make this large branch unexpectedly break and fall. The break was right in the middle of the branch, and there is no sign of insects, borers or decay. What happened?… Read More →